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Sue's Bird Blog Archives

BOS Fall Migrant Field Trip

Published September 15, 2013
Tags: General Observations, Bay-Breasted Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Cape May Warbler, Black-and-White Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Least Bittern, American Redstart, Blackpoll Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Palm Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Wilson's Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Philadelphia Vireo, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Monarch Butterfly

I joined the Fall Migrant BOS field trip at Tifft Nature Preserve today, led by Joe Mitchell. I had arrived a little early, still on my quest to conquer my current nemesis, the American Bittern. No luck with THAT bittern, but once again, I did find two Least Bitterns before the field trip began. And fortunately, one of the Least Bitterns was still out and visible in the reeds when the group arrived and I think most got to see it.

The rest of the 4-5 hour field trip was very successful with warblers.  We found many, includng: Bay-Breasted, Chestnut-sided, Cape May, Black-and-White, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, American Redstart, Blackpoll, Tennessee, Nashville, Magnolia, Palm, Yellow-rumped, Common Yellowthroat, and Wilson's.

Two vireos were also found, a lovely Philadelphia who gave us nice views as it caught and ate a couple of insects and a beautiful songster, a Warbling Vireo.

Joe's keen eyes also spotted two female Scarlet Tanagers from quite a distance. He really has a knack for those tanagers, having found the more rare Summer Tanager on the Spring Migration BOS field trip. We also saw a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak and 2 Hummingbirds on the trip.

After I left, I heard there was a question about a diving duck out on Beth Pond where the Ring-necked Duck has been summering.  It may end up being identified as a scaup of some kind.

On a side note, I was happy to see so many Monarchs coming through the park. I imagine they are on their journey south. The Monarch is in jeopardy, losing its wintering habitat in Central America due to illegal logging. Here in the US, its breeding grounds have been decreasing every year due to habitat loss and what remains are being poisoned by certain pesticides being used. Their populations have been severely reduced over the last couple of years and there are dire predictions that, unless drastic measures are taken, we not have this beautiful butterfly for more than a few years at best. I captured many photos today, hoping they're not my last.

It was great seeing so many familiar faces again today - and a big thank you to Joe for leading this large group of 26 through Tifft and for finding so many wonderful birds!
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One of two Least Bitterns seen today
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The SECOND Least Bittern
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American Redstart (male)
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A poor shot of the Philadelphia Vireo
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Magnolia Warbler
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Magnolia Warbler
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Black-throated Green Warbler
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Black-throated Green Warbler
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Black-and-White Warbler
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Black-and-White Warbler
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Bay-breasted Warbler
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Bay-breasted Warbler
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Nashville Warbler
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Black Water Snake - these guys can be aggressive and will BITE!
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Monarch Butterfly - critically endangered
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Monarch Butterfly
Reply from: Donna on 9/15/2013 6:59 PM
 You really captured nice images of birds today. I had fun, although seeing the birds, did not take photos of all the Warblers. Very nice selection of the birds today, Sue.