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Sue's Bird Blog Archives

Warblers, Kinglets, and White-throated Sparrows

Published September 28, 2013
Tags: Parks and Preserves, Palm Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Palm Warbler, White-throated Sparrow, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Brown Thrasher, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Today, I stopped at a couple places along the waterfront, including Woodlawn Beach State Park, Times Beach, and Tifft Nature preserve. Migrants were still out and about and I enjoyed seeing a few warblers as well as some nice surprises.

There were no surprises at Woodlawn Beach or Times Beach. Water birds were scarce, barring Canada Geese, Double-crested Cormorants, and gulls. The same was true of water birds over at Tifft, but I did see a couple of groups of warblers, my first of the season Ruby-crowned Kinglets and White-throated Sparrows.  As a matter of fact, I heard the haunting whistle sounds of the White-throated Sparrows before I even saw one and felt a little thrill to think they were back in town. It's funny how you begin to look forward to their appearances!

I also found several Ruby-crowned Kinglets up in a willow tree.  I never got any decent photos of them (yet!) but it was great seeing those cute, little warbler-like fellows too.  My first of the season sightings of them was actually over at Amherst State Park this past Wednesday evening. I ran into Sal over there and we enjoyed watching some Golden-crowned and Ruby-crowned Kinglets mixing in with a bunch of warblers

Sal had pointed out the sound of a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker to me that night - and I heard it again today at Tifft. I actually knew just what to look for - and I eventually found two young sapsuckers working hard at finding insects on a tree together.

Another nice find was a Brown Thrasher.  This guy alternated between feeding on berries in a bush and looking for insects on the ground.  He allowed me a few photos, for which I was grateful.

In the warbler department, Yellow-rumps outnumbered any other species, with Palms coming in a close second.  I did not find a single flycatcher nor thrush (outside of the ubiquitous American Robin!).
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Tennessee Warbler
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Tennessee Warbler
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Nashville Warbler (Times Beach)
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Nashville Warbler
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Palm Warbler
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Palm Warbler
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Palm Warbler (Times Beach)
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Magnolia Warbler
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Yellow-rumped Warbler
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White-throated Sparrow
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House Wren
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House Wren
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Immature Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
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Brown Thrasher
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Brown Thrasher
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Great Egret
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Red-tailed Hawk
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Spider advancing towards its prey
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The wrap job took all of 4 seconds